Come Fly With Me

Authors: Quintus van Galen & Bram Longmore
Professor: Katrien Verbert
TA: Francisco Gutiérrez

There’s a lot happening in the world, and I mean that literally. Almost every service people use has a huge back-end dedicated to it to ensure it keeps running smoothly, a beehive of activities that we don’t often get to see. This is particularly true for anything regarding aviation: a busy international airport can see up to one plane depart or land every ten seconds, and to keep things running there are a plethora of tasks that have to be completed before an airplane can take you to your holiday destination.

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Impact Of The Food Industry On The Environment

Author: Ana Vergazova
Professor: Katrien Verbert
TA: Francisco Gutiérrez

Sustainable living, ethical fashion, veganism, Cowspiracy – all these words seem to become more popular, and there is a lot information on that at the web. People and media publish statistics, which sometimes are shocking, and it is hard to believe that this is the current situation, how could we destroy our planet that much?

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Colors of Europeana

Author:  Feng Du
Professor: Katrien Verbert
TA: Francisco Gutiérrez
This visualization examines the overall usage of 110 colors in European art history and how 7 major colors spread around different countries in different times. The project uses Europeana art history collection as the dataset. The dataset contains approximately one million digitalized artworks in history. A python program was used to extract the metadata of the art works, including the year when the artwork was created, the original country of the art work, and the predominant color used in the work. The extract information was formatted in Excel, with each row representing an artwork. Later, using the data visualization tool Tableau.

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Mapping Job Vacancies and Available Labour Force in Belgium

Authors: Evelien Herelixka & Paola Verhaert
Professor: Katrien Verbert
TA: Francisco Gutiérrez

For this project, we mapped the current state of the Belgian labour market, by visualising job vacancies and the available labour force in Belgium. The visualisation project consists of two dashboards. Each dashboard shows on the one hand the amount of vacancies and on the other hand the amount of people looking for a job. In that way, the supply and demand can be easily compared. Each of the two dashboards has a different filter. The first dashboard shows the amount of vacancies and people based on their location, while the other one shows the amount of vacancies and people depending on the sector of interest.

Demo: [Click Here] and [Here]

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Marvel Wiki

Authors: Cara Pelsmaekers, Carole Urlings & Sytze Van Herck
Professor: Katrien Verbert
TA: Francisco Gutiérrez


Our team of KU Leuven Digital Humanities students chose to visualise data from several Marvel wiki datasets. It includes information about the characters, such as a description, eye and hair color, sex, sexual orientation etcetera. As tools we mostly used Tableau, supplemented with Voyant for the word clouds.

Demo: [click here]

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Twitter Data Visualization

Author: Negin Eisazadeh & Mary Yacob
Professor: Katrien Verbert
TA: Francisco Gutiérrez


The twitter data is associated with a specific hashtag community, it was extracted through a twitter API in the form of CSV files. The total number of extracted files are fourteen, each containing one month worth of tweets, and each file includes an average of 1 million rows.

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London Lit Map

Authors: Kyle Dase & Brendan Swalm
Professor: Katrien Verbert
TA: Francisco Gutiérrez


This project combines Charles Booth’s 1889 map of poverty and criminality in London with significant locations in fin-de-siècle horror fantasy, creating a geographical representation of the 19th-century reader and author’s perception of space in London. This method of visualization allows readers to explore relationships between the London of the late 19th century, perceived as a deterministically economic space in which wealth and status were negatively correlated with criminality, and the fantasy of horror, the uncanny, and the invading Other that threatened to destabilize or subvert established relationships of power and society in the city at the turn of the century. The situation, and potential mobility, of the Londoner/protagonist (and, in many cases, the reader themselves) as Self, and that of the destabilizing Other take on a unique legibility when their places and paths are not only textually, but visually marked on and within the mapped city.

Demo: [click here]

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